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Criminal Law: Criminal Law

The research guide provides an overview of federal and Hawaii criminal law resources and other related resources. It does not cover international laws.

Data Sources & Statistics

Legal News

Periodicals

Treatises

Joseph G. Cook, Constitutional Rights of the Accused (3rd ed., 1996), Electronic version trough Westlaw.

Wayne R. LaFave, Criminal Law (5th ed., 2010), KF9219 .L38 2010.
Part of the Hornbook Series, provides a good background and overview of the subject.

Wayne R. LaFave, Jerold H. Israel and Nancy J. King, Criminal Procedure (3rd ed., 2007), KF9619 .L15 2007. Electronic version through Westlaw.
6-volume set "analyz[ing] the law governing all of the major steps in the criminal justice process, starting with investigation and ending with post-appeal collateral attacks." 

Lester B. Orfield and Mark S. Rhodes, Orfield's Criminal Procedure Under the Federal Rules (2d ed., 1993), Electronic version through Westlaw.
"Practical application of the law and historical commentary of the law's development are included in the discussion of each rule."

Wayne R. LaFave, Search and Seizure: A Treatise on the Fourth Amendment (5th ed., 2012), KF9630 .L26 2012.
6-volume set reporting "in a systematic and orderly fashion the current state of 4th Amendment law and also to present a critical assessment of how the Supreme Court and the lower courts have found in their ongoing and challenging enterprise of giving context and meaning to the 4th Amendment."

Barbara E. Bergman and Nancy Hollander, Wharton's Criminal Evidence (15th ed., 2001), KF9660 .B47 2001, Electronic version through Westlaw.
8-volume set kept up to date by pocket supplements. It includes all significant decisions of the United States Supreme Court interpreting the Federal Rules of Evidence as well as state court decisions interpreting comparable state provisions.

Charles E. Torcia, Wharton's Criminal Law (15th ed., 1993), Electronic version through Westlaw.
Describing the common law background of crimes and defenses. Statutes are considered only to the extent that they may have played a part in the decision of cited cases.

Note: Westlaw access for law students, faculty and staff with login and password.

Online Resources

Blogs

Author

Brian Huffman's picture
Brian Huffman
Contact:
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
William S. Richardson School of Law
2525 Dole Street
Honolulu Hawaii 96822-2350
United States
Website